Australian brand Tigerlily shuts down its Instagram page to reinvent the company

Australian bohemian fashion label Tigerlily has deleted all 4,300 posts on Instagram in a shock move that has sparked rumours of a massive brand overhaul.

The social media wipeout, which happened at midnight on Friday, left many of its 300,000 followers baffled, with the only clue of what was to come being an Instagram bio that stated: ‘The renaissance is coming. We’re ready, are you?’.

In place of the traditional gold brand logo there is now a red asymmetric ‘T’ and the release of a Resort 2020 fashion collection that harks back to its feminine, desert island aesthetic. 

Tigerlily deleted 4,300 posts on Instagram as they move away from its traditional logo (pictured) and swimwear focus

Tigerlily deleted 4,300 posts on Instagram as they move away from its traditional logo (pictured) and swimwear focus

Tigerlily's Instagram page was entirely bare on Friday as it cleansed the social media site of its old images

Tigerlily’s Instagram page was entirely bare on Friday as it cleansed the social media site of its old images

‘The most common misconception is that we are a swimwear brand but we have been about apparel for the past 20 years,’ Tigerlily CEO Chris Buchanan told News.com.au about the new look. 

‘We will have much more of a focus on apparel given it accounts for 80 per cent of our sales.’

There are now four posts hinting at the ‘new era’ of Tigerlily on its Instagram page, with snapshots of the resort wear. 

Earlier this year the brand chose to send models down the catwalk in Sydney after a 17-year hiatus, and didn’t adorn anyone in their famous swimwear.

The company is known for its boho styling

Thousands of swimwear pieces are sold each year

The social media wipeout, which happened at midnight on Friday, left many of their 300,000 followers baffled (customers pictured in Tigerlily swim and dresses)

This is what Tigerlily's Instagram page looked like before the blackout online

This is what Tigerlily’s Instagram page looked like before the blackout online

In part this was because they were hoping to make this transition later in the year and dispel the myth that they only produce high quality bikinis.

‘All of our overseas growth comes from the apparel business. After 20 years, we see it as the perfect opportunity to really crystallise and communicate our new brand purpose,’ Mr Buchanan told the publication.

He isn’t worried that the move will turn away customers and explained that the Instagram blackout has actually helped the brand gain 1,000 followers.

Comments left on their new Instagram posts suggest a divide in public opinion, with some saying ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it’.

‘Now I need to go buy up all the swimwear,’ one person wrote.

Another said they ‘loved the revamp’ and were ‘excited to try more investment pieces’. 

There has been a huge surge of interest globally for the Aussie-made products, particularly in the UK, Middle East and the US. 

He isn't worried that the move will turn away customers (pictured in Tigerlily) and explained that the Instagram blackout has actually helped the brand gain 1,000 followers

He isn’t worried that the move will turn away customers (pictured in Tigerlily) and explained that the Instagram blackout has actually helped the brand gain 1,000 followers

There has been a huge surge of interest globally for the Aussie-made products, particularly in the UK, Middle East and the US

The last collection was filled with aqua pieces

The brand’s sense of style won’t change and they will still offer plenty of flirty and feminine pieces

This post declared the Tigerlily mission statement for their 300,000 followers to note (and the new logo is pictured bottom right)

This post declared the Tigerlily mission statement for their 300,000 followers to note (and the new logo is pictured bottom right)

Swimwear model Jodhi Meares (pictured) founded the brand in 2000 before selling it for $5.8million to Queensland-based label Billabong

Swimwear model Jodhi Meares (pictured) founded the brand in 2000 before selling it for $5.8million to Queensland-based label Billabong

Creative director Amelia Mather, who joined the Tigerlily crew at the age of 21, played a pivotal role in moving the business to a more clothing-centric focus.

‘All year round, everyone can wear clothing. We make it accessible to a range of age groups and shapes, and people want to buy into that Australian beach lifestyle wherever they are,’ she told the Financial Review in 2017.

Swimwear model Jodhi Meares founded the brand in 2000 before selling it for $5.8million to Queensland-based label Billabong.

Billabong went on to sell Tigerlily for 10 times the price – or an estimated $60million – to Crescent Capital Partners in 2017.